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Museums: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

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John Oliver discusses some of the world’s most prestigious museums, why they contain so many stolen goods, the market that continues to illegally trade antiquities, and a pretty solid blueprint for revenge.

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YORUMLAR 13 176
silver megaman
silver megaman Aylar önce
I once saw that someone said that the only reason Egypt still has the pyramids is that they were too big to be moved to Britain
Neil Brucker
Neil Brucker 6 saatler önce
Sounds about right
How to change name?
How to change name? 17 saatler önce
But you forgot that it wasn't stair-like like nowadays, its triangle and it was chipped to its current shape
Chumbenthung ngullie utube
00000000000033333
georgia ithaca
georgia ithaca Gün önce
The level of consumerism. Our culture is an aesthetic for them. Something for them to take photos with without knowing their meaning, their significance or why we made them. It's a fucking disgrace.
burlingk
burlingk Aylar önce
"If you say yes to one, you would suddenly find the British Museum is empty." That's kinda the point.
LittleBird
LittleBird 6 gün önce
Seriously, theres not enough british things to fill the british museum?
Darla Henri
Darla Henri 8 gün önce
If you find something and pay for it and someone else moved to the area and would destroy it or sell it. BS Ancient Egypt no longer exists to be stolen from.
burlingk
burlingk 10 gün önce
@DomInator Without the consent of those it was taken from.
Bencil Sharpie
Bencil Sharpie 11 gün önce
@bina nocht Yes. If that stuff has been in Dubai for hundreds of years I'd find it dumb for Americans to start demand it should be returned. War is part of history no matter if we like it or not, and it was a very common practice. I don't see the point in returning stuff that's been in a country's possession for hundreds of years. It would for example be weird if France demanded the return of items that at one time belonged to France discovered in Egypt left from the Crusade. At least I am being consistent with my stance.
bina nocht
bina nocht 11 gün önce
@Bencil Sharpie no they don't at all. The uk museums have had egyptian artifacts for hundreds of years. It hasn't become part of uk culture ..british people dont even understand the significance. They just want it for the gold and the rarity ..culturally it means nothing to them if it meant anything they would understand why it should be returned. Because all these artifacts have meaning to the people to whom they belong. ....imagine arabs having linc9lns hat and jfks car or whatever americans value ..their constitution the first american flag....because Ísis stole it and took it back to sell and make money to buy weapons to attack america...and now it sits in dubai museum for people to gawp at how pretty it is (sorry america doesnt have any good examples lol) but would you feel that the american constitution is now a part of dubais cultural heritage because they bought it from people who stole it from you during a massacre of your people and a rape of your women....and now shoppers can view it in the mall when they go to dubai. So that's part of their cultural heritage now. Not at all. It means something to americans. It belonged to americans. Whether they had the artifacts or not it would be part of their cultural heritage nó doubt they would revere a mock up of it more than any passer by would even understand of the ré artifact. Absolutely it does not become part of anotther cultures heritage by being in their possession.
CaptMortifyd
CaptMortifyd Aylar önce
"The difference between archaeology and looting is 50 years." - one of my anthropology professors explaining the fucked up providence arguments of museums.
Cellomii
Cellomii 2 gün önce
@TRvid user And chef dinossaurs are paleontology, archaeology is for human stuff only
Kyle Kataryn
Kyle Kataryn 3 gün önce
anthropology is just cannibals licking bones.
distantignition
distantignition 9 gün önce
Lyndon B. Johnson died just under 50 years ago, and I've been waiting to sell his ribs for foreverrrrrrrrr
Jubblie
Jubblie 12 gün önce
@TRvid user And chef that's paleontology.
YouTube user And chef
YouTube user And chef 12 gün önce
But what about dinosaurs
Jean-Luc
Jean-Luc Aylar önce
"Can we have our stuff back?" "I don't know. I'm not sure you can even prove it is your stuff." "Yes, I can. You put it in a display case, with a little placard VERY EXPLICITLY STATING THAT IT IS MY STUFF" The British Museum in a nutshell
John Ericsson
John Ericsson 27 gün önce
Hello how are you
Ayda Moftah
Ayda Moftah Aylar önce
I’m half Egyptian and I’m born and raised in Egypt. When I was little, I was SO fascinated by ancient Egyptian culture. When I was about 6 years old, my mom’s friend took me to the Egyptian museum. To my horror, almost all the artefacts weren’t available to see. There were just glass cases with photos of what would have been there, but were at other museums in Western Europe, the UK, or NY. The new Egyptian museum is opening up soon and supposedly it’ll have the largest archeological collection in the world. Here’s hoping that it’s not just going to be a huge disappointment like I had as a kid.
Darla Henri
Darla Henri 2 gün önce
@King Devil ha
King Devil
King Devil 2 gün önce
Remember what Taliban did to Buddha carving, well that's you.
Darla Henri
Darla Henri 8 gün önce
You didn't discover it. You or your family moved to the area, when?
Stoodmuffin Personal
Stoodmuffin Personal 11 gün önce
@Ayda Moftah holy shit. That is madness.
Stoodmuffin Personal
Stoodmuffin Personal 11 gün önce
@A person That sounds about right. Not good or moral, but about correct 😅
Sunni Rae
Sunni Rae Aylar önce
Lets all appreciate that HBO puts all LWT episodes in almost their entirety for free on youtube without a shitton of ads.
Matias Dubs
Matias Dubs 22 gün önce
Duh! If they didn't, who would actually watch it?
Silver Quill Creative Group
@Quinn Grey 😂😂😂yes the comments are great! And so positive! We need and University of Last Week Tonight!!
Sara Millard
Sara Millard 26 gün önce
If only they would unlock it in other countries sooner than a month + later 😔
Euro Guy 85
Euro Guy 85 27 gün önce
I don't think HBO is cash strapped for ad money on youtube but if there were, that money should go to the legal department of John's show; the most overworked legal department since the public defenders office of NYC in the 80s & 90s. 😂 😂
Astalthæon
Astalthæon 27 gün önce
HBO made like 3.5-4 billion dollars on Game of Thrones alone. They can afford to put shit on YT without advertising....
Nicole Seguin
Nicole Seguin Aylar önce
My daughter works at the National Museum of Scotland and worked hard to help a indigenous community from our home in Canada try to repatriate a memorial pole that was stolen from their community. She was disciplined for trying to help them. I’d love you to do a story about their struggle.
News Now BC
News Now BC 2 gün önce
So she went to Scotland to try and help steal away their artifacts? Hopefully they fire her.
Vasco Apolonio
Vasco Apolonio 3 gün önce
Not only Scotland, but Scottish People are different from English. More open. They felt in their skins the evil from Britain...
Ivonna Trolue
Ivonna Trolue 3 gün önce
What is wrong with sccotland?
Nicole Seguin
Nicole Seguin 9 gün önce
@kestaa I very much hope The National Museum of Scotland can be a leader in reparations. It is a huge passion for my daughter. She hopes to complete her Archaeology degree.
kestaa
kestaa 9 gün önce
Thank you to your daughter for her efforts. This story got a fair bit of press here in Canada when the Nisga'a delegation visited the museum in August, but I assume the repatriation efforts have stalled since there have been no updates since then. Still, the fact that the museum was willing to meet and discuss the possible repatriation brings me some hope. The British Museum has another Nisga'a pole which they purchased from the same man (Marius Barbeau) who sold the pole in the National Museum of Scotland. They also have a Haida pole acquired from a different collector. Maybe Scotland can set an example that prompts the British Museum to return these two poles and other artifacts looted throughout history.
Lavrentivs
Lavrentivs Aylar önce
I quite like what the swedish etnographical museum did. They had a totempole that had been purchased from native americans in the early 1900's and brought to Sweden. When the tribe wanted it back, they returned it in exchange for a newly made pole by the tribe. So not only did the tribe get their totempole back, the tradition of making them were kept alive and the swedish museum still had an excibit. Can add that the Kitlope people then decided that the totempole should return to moder earth and buried it to molder.
Joel Thorstensson
Joel Thorstensson 4 gün önce
@Royalname31 Swede here: We have a lot of fucked up ahit in our museums, several Sámi artifacts, pictures of naked sámis (they were forced) as part of "racial" studies and so much more. Whilst our country is alright, we aren't saints.
Royalname31
Royalname31 7 gün önce
Damn, why do Sweeden people sound like the most reasonable of the world? Literally just a bit of communication, and there you go, nothing is lost
John Ericsson
John Ericsson 24 gün önce
Hello how are you
Md Asaduzzaman Mana
That open question about how long someone can be dead for it to be okay to have a piece of their body is superb.
Halcón Sierreño
Halcón Sierreño 17 gün önce
Everyone will give different ages.
Rua O'Neill
Rua O'Neill 17 gün önce
I love it, it wasn't even a joke, it was just there to make people feel uncomfortable.
Francis Amani
Francis Amani 18 gün önce
True, true... Makes you question a lot
schrodingers cat
schrodingers cat 24 gün önce
@Connor Inglis It depends mainly on the ethnicity of the individual. I mean during the colonial period the British were sometimes reluctant to even wait for the person to die of natural causes and sped up the timeline if the person was sufficiently foreign.
Hipster Masochist
Hipster Masochist 24 gün önce
I'd say like 100-150 years give or take after that put my bones in a poorly cared for store room
Adora Tsang
Adora Tsang 22 gün önce
"We keep these loots because we can take better care of them." The British Museum cut up a 1000-year old Chinese silk scroll, because it was too long for their European picture frames. You can see them in pieces, the ends were just thrown out.
justrandomotaku
justrandomotaku 3 gün önce
They did that?? Wtf!! That is horrendous.
musicsangel
musicsangel 24 gün önce
I used to work in museums and the entire "We can't give them back if they can't take care of them" narrative was literally taught in the museum studies program I graduated from. It's infuriating. Reproduction tech is SO advanced now - there are pieces in the collection of the org I worked for that swap out the originals for repros all the time and you cannot tell the difference. There is no excuse to not reproduce artifacts for a collection and return the originals to where they came from other than greed and a refusal to spend the money. It's cheaper to make a repro of a ceremonial robe than it is to construct a humidity-controlled, UV-protected, environmentally sealed case to display it in. Just saying.
News Now BC
News Now BC 2 gün önce
Ruin the originals but it's ok because we made a copy. What a ridiculous woke argument.
Irene Rudyj
Irene Rudyj 7 gün önce
There was no ethics class?
Royalname31
Royalname31 7 gün önce
With the use of 3D printing technology, I'm pretty sure you could easily replicate it
Florendil Hobbit
Florendil Hobbit 11 gün önce
@Collin Yeah Pretty much this. Also, instead of spending lots of time and resources on preventing museums in their places of origin to get them, The museums that have them ATM could help the other museums gain expertise in how to handle such relicts and items of interest.
YouTube user And chef
YouTube user And chef 12 gün önce
British museum 500k subscribers
AnnoyingMoose
AnnoyingMoose Aylar önce
The heart of the Solomon story is that the baby's true mother loved it so much that she showed that love by being willing to let that baby not be in her possession instead of having it hacked into pieces.
Marina Seyboldt
Marina Seyboldt 14 gün önce
The baby in the Solomon story wasn't going to be hacked to pieces. It was going to be cut in half so each mother could have half a baby. But I guess that counts as pieces.....
Rua O'Neill
Rua O'Neill 17 gün önce
@Mellie I love this show, but tbf I think this joke would have been better.
Mellie
Mellie 18 gün önce
@kriley9386 oh get over yourself. He totally understands the real story. The entire show was mocking the scientist who said it. It's called satire!!
kriley9386
kriley9386 18 gün önce
Yes, I think our beloved John Oliver missed this point.
Jenn Sutton
Jenn Sutton 27 gün önce
THIS
Ginika Akpata
Ginika Akpata Aylar önce
Thank you John so much the Benin Bronzes are my heritage and it breaks my heart when seeing them various museums all scrambled after being ripped from their home. I sent this to my father who has been fighting to bring them back and this spotlight made him so happy that there’s more attention on this. As a first generation African American, I want to know my history my home and thank you for doing something that might get that history back ❤
distantignition
distantignition 9 gün önce
White people sure are good at picking and choosing which parts of African history should be remembered or forgotten.
WaxonWaxoff
WaxonWaxoff 13 gün önce
I am very glad, that there is a movement starting in the West to repatriate these artifacts. I wish I could say the same for the 60,000 artifacts Japan stole from Korea and dared call some Koreans thieves when they forcibly repatriated 2 buddhist statues in 2012 and 2014. (Hell, even the Kizaemon Ido, officially hailed as a national treasure was a 1500s stolen Korean artifact... of a peasant bowl because Japan couldn't even make a peasant bowl, so engrossed in samurais imposing 75% tax rates to raise militaries to kill each other) And even said this "theft" is why they can't return the remaining 60,000 to Korea. Well if they were going to return it, they would have done so centuries ago, and should not have even stolen it in the first place. This is like calling the police the "thieves" when said police was just apprehending the real thief and forcibly returning his loot to the rightful owners.
Cookie Cutter
Cookie Cutter 26 gün önce
Such a travesty for the British not to return the records of your cultural history as it holds a deep meaning to your people; shameful arrogance to feel entitled to what is not theirs to keep.
Laurie Jean
Laurie Jean Aylar önce
Bless your father!
Kitsmashing
Kitsmashing Aylar önce
I really dont understand why we cant just create realistic duplicates for viewing in the west. Its litterally what we do with natural history museums, the majority of old west attractions, and everyone loves it and still appreciates it even if its not the original. Also loved the "oversized schnauz and this fd up dinger" bit, lol.
Akhenaten
Akhenaten Gün önce
@Ducklingscap People won’t waste their time on duplicates since it’s worthless.
stan frymann
stan frymann Gün önce
@Ducklingscap I agree. It's more of a potential concern in the US, where Native American items are sometimes placed back into service and eventually wear out.
Ducklingscap
Ducklingscap Gün önce
@stan frymann It really depends what you are studying though. If you ignore DNA (and original material) nearly everything else can be replicated to look exactly like the original so most studies could still be done. Even DNA sequences can be shared online once you discovered them on the object. And well I suppose if you want to study the rest you might need to travel. But why would british researchers have more right to study... let's say Egypt artifacts than the people in Egypt?
Ducklingscap
Ducklingscap Gün önce
@Akhenaten This is the 2020s you canc create duplicates that are basically indistinguishable from the original for the human eye (and most people wouldn't be able to see the differences either).
TheSuperappelflap
TheSuperappelflap 2 gün önce
The problem with that would be that the narcissistic sociopaths running our society would have to give other people their stuff back, they want it all for themselves specifically so that no one else can have it. That is the point.
GoldenFlute88
GoldenFlute88 Aylar önce
Gotta love the logic of the British Museum Act of 1963 being like "we made a law that says we can't give you back stuff that we stole from you."
Franklin
Franklin Gün önce
@1Born Confused The really funny part about it. Is that, it looks like you took a lot of time, making that reply. It took all of 4 seconds for me to realize I didn't want to read the rest.
Franklin
Franklin Gün önce
@1Born Confused You are acting like I should care of his opinions. I don't. Neither do most other people. It doesn't rank high in things people think about. But good luck.
1Born Confused
1Born Confused Gün önce
@Franklin except you've conveniently forgotten the point John made in this video, that the people who brag that they're better at preserving the artifacts actually aren't, when they can't even do something as clean them properly. Not to mention that your attitude of "Trust us, we know better," is incredibly arrogant and condecending towards the people who have the right over these artifacts, because it implies they know less or have less skills or have less interest in maintaining and preserving the artifacts. Which is an attitude that has been perpetuated time and again against "the other." And to your absolutely laughable point of "America will never be invaded,"...yeah, talk to the First Nations of this land. And then turn around and talk about how America's literal invasion of Iraq, which is the location of Babylon, had a huge hand in not only severely damaging the actual site of Babylon because its army was stationed nearby, but also had a hand in looting not only the place but a nearby museum in the area working to preserve the site and it's artifacts. And then the president had the audacity to say "We're bringing civilization to the Iraqi people." To the place that is the literal birthplace, the cradle of civilization. The sheer gall and arrogance. You want to be able to see these original artifacts of other civilizations? How about governments stop invading these lands, looting, plundering and pillaging them? Instead, help them out by not destabilizing them, and then promote and encourage travel there instead? That way, you get to see what you want to see, the people keep their heritage, and everyone's horizons expand. And the third world countries of which you speak - many, many of them were rich, thriving areas back in the day, before foreign invaders from Europe came, looted and pillaged them, stole their artifacts, stripped them of their ways of government and installed their own versions. Versions that completely disregarded the validity of the native way and were worse than what existed before. And again as John pointed out, you/the museums don't actually have ownership of these items, when many of them were proven to be stolen in the first place. Protect your borders? What do you think other countries are doing - just sitting around dwiddling their thumbs? They're all trying to do the same thing.
Deborah Byrne
Deborah Byrne 2 gün önce
So what does Ireland need to do? Britain has our artefacts. What's your excuse now? I assure you Ireland has museums. Are you going to claim that we don't. What's your next excuse? What about Greece? This excuse the British peddle doesn't quite fit does it, when you consider they haven't returned artefacts to developed nations. The British will make any excuse to hang on to their stolen loot.
Franklin
Franklin 5 gün önce
@Was here China makes most of the products you use today. Should they demand you give back all your possessions made in China. Because their ancestors made them? 🙄 Your argument has no merit. Nor does it work in the real world.
Iwan de Jongh
Iwan de Jongh Aylar önce
The impact of this whole piece culminating in Kumail Nanjiani's comment about Gerald Ford's ribs is profound and so understated! Well done LWT!! (Ps Kumail's delivery is masterful!)
Noel B.
Noel B. 17 gün önce
I was wondering if he was Taika Waititi 😅
Eslam Mohamed
Eslam Mohamed 26 gün önce
Yes of course
MrSlowestD16
MrSlowestD16 Aylar önce
No it's not, lol. Very few would give a fuck.
Paulette Emerson
Paulette Emerson Aylar önce
couldn't agree more.
Briala B
Briala B Aylar önce
The thinking behind: if we gave some of the stuff we stole back we'd have to give all the stuff we stole back, so...no. That's insane. If an institution only exists because of a series of moral and ethical wrongs, then that institution should not exist. Not unless you can right those wrongs and transform it into something that sustains itself ethically.
DrRockkso
DrRockkso 19 gün önce
Britain has plenty of its own history and artifacts they could showcase in the British Museum instead of relying on stuff they stole from other countries.
Lawrence Iverson
Lawrence Iverson Aylar önce
@Yudith Caron And are now a pile of dust or in a private collection.
Yudith Caron
Yudith Caron Aylar önce
The Greeks really have a good idea there. All Occidental museums should build replicas of the art that was stolen and display that with a sign that says (truthfully) that the original was returned to its home country.
Nix
Nix Aylar önce
When I was a preteen, my hometown museum hosted a British Museum exhibit. It was deeply moving to witness room after room of stunning artifacts… and then I came to a huge wooden Buddha head, the plaque of which indicated that it had been removed from a statue. Somewhere out there was a headless statue, hundreds of years old and of great spiritual significance to any number of people. Who decided they could do without it? In that awful moment I realized many of the items around me had been stolen in one way or another. I’m of Greek descent so I should have known this from the start. I finished my tour of the exhibit with horrified eyes. John Oliver and team have done an excellent job once again. Love the closing skit. F U, ongoing colonialism!
Sweer
Sweer Aylar önce
Doesn't or didn't the British Museum also have the skeleton remains of Charles Byrne who specifically stated multiple times he didn't want his remains displayed and had his body sunk in the ocean to prevent it, and they still took it? (This was the Irish Giant, and I remember the British Museum getting a lot of backlash and seeing a petition growing traction so perhaps his remains are out, but I remember that being a thing from Ask A Mortician's channel).
Churchgrimm
Churchgrimm Aylar önce
Not the British museum, but actually the Hunterian Museum owned and managed by the Royal College of Surgeons of England. The problem was just as you said, however, they were/are (not sure what recent developments there have been) displaying his body expressly against Charles Byrne's wishes.
Amin Mian
Amin Mian 18 gün önce
this whole story reminds me of that scene in Marvel's Black Panther where Kill Monger (Michael B Jordon's character) went to the British Museum and told the expert there how they got their artifacts by taking it by force.
WaxonWaxoff
WaxonWaxoff 13 gün önce
Japan is very guilty of this too and unlike the West, don't even admit any of it but straight up drive their entire national rhetoric to play the race card against "evil Americans." _(there's a good reason 1 billion Asians cheered for nuclear emancipation from human experimentation, genocide, massacres, cannibalism, sex slavery, forced labor, while 30 million were killed by the Japanese with WMDs like germ and chemical bombs and 2 Japanese nukes in development)_ And even before colonizing Okinawa and appropriating their culture while confiscating all their weapons and imposing an even higher 90% tax rate than people back at home with 70% tax rates which already made, according to 19th century analyst Nobuhiro Satou, 1/3 of peasants killed a baby each year (he even gave specific numbers for each region). _(Calling Karate Japanese is like calling curry English, and it's no wonder Okinawans want independence like Ireland did from the English. Karate was developed to use everyday farming tools like grindstone handles as tonfas and threshing flails as nunchaku, all to disable samurai oppressors' katanas and save their Okinawan families from brutal exploitation and butchering. Lots of basic karate moves make no sense until you realize it's meant to be exercises for tonfas)_ Japan was always a land full of pirates and samurai slavers that weren't content selling their own girls to Portuguese slavers for muskets (but not cannons, they thought cannons were useless until they realized their mistake when they invaded Korea in 1592 and was repelled by Korean cannons and organ guns and missile artillery. They first tried to make their own cannons in 1609) _(Also they had an international slave girl brothel empire from the 1500s to 1900s called Karayuki-san funding their wars, sacrificing their 300,000 girls in the 50 years around 1900 alone for "progress", their slave girl empire even reached as far as India and Australia. It's reviving now too as Japanese economy goes into a 30-year recession and American monetary and tech is finally pulled out of Japan after the Cold War and Japanese can't back their propaganda anymore when they are left to stand on their own)._ No, they had to go around raiding coastal towns all over East Asia for slaves, pottery, gold, and buddhist statues. In fact the Kinzaemon Ido pottery, a national treasure of Japan since the 1500s, is actually discovered to be some Korean peasant's bowl stolen by Japanese slavers. Then they weren't satisfied with that and kidnapped 1000s of potters and technicians to develop Japan's backwards industry and culture in the 1590s invasions of Korea. The Shim SuGwan (Chin Jukan)s are 15 generations of the best potters in Japan who retain their Korean identity to this day and hold annual Korean ceremonies and such. Then of course they stamp their seal on it and sell it overseas as their achievements, which is like if someone came and kidnapped 1000s of bright minds in the Silicon Valley and made them work for them and announce to the world their country is full of geniuses. Japan was forever the backwards island of genocidal samurais killing the Ezo, Hayato, Kumaso, the original native Japanese to extinction without even any native reservations and the Ainu and Ryukyuan and Nivkh and Oroks have fled off of Japanese mainland entirely, and desperate for cultural advances from the continent (even the miitary dictator Tokugawa Shogunate begged Korea to send scholars and artisans to educate them, as "TongShinSa," and had huge parades going through Japan whenever they come every 30 years or so, any more frequent would bankrupt those cities they passed through) and had a deep seated inferiority complex which is why they were so violent and arrogant. In 2012 and 2014, some Koreans forcibly repatriated 2 buddhist statues, just 2 of 60,000 Korean treasures still kept stolen by Japanese pirates in the 1600s and put in display/temples, and were called thieves by the Japanese when they were the ones who stole it for centuries. And even said this "theft" is why they can't return the remaining 60,000 to Korea. Well if they were going to return it, they would have done so centuries ago, and should not have even stolen it in the first place. This is like calling the police the "thieves" when he was just apprehending the real thief and forcibly returning his loot to the rightful owners.
Shay Morcormick
Shay Morcormick Aylar önce
Seeing all those artifacts in boxes and growing up surrounded by native tribes made me tear up. Knowing how many were killed without mercy and looted. All these items stored away still stained with blood and pain. Anyone of those boxes would bring so much back to tribes that have so little left of their past
YouTube user And chef
YouTube user And chef 12 gün önce
Well in return Everyone wears Yves saint Laurent, dior, Burberry, Karl lagerfeld, Zara, Ralph Lauren, Calvin Klein, Victoria secret, Nike, tom Ford, Fendi, Versace, Louis Vuitton, chanel etc
Steven Spangler
Steven Spangler 22 gün önce
Worse yet, witness the slight camera angle to include the guide's face in the same camera shot. I'm sure this was NOT an accident. You can see the clueless glee on the guide's face thinking they'd be so happy to see these artifacts, when in fact it was devastating to see their culture buried in boxes in a basement. If white privilege could be captured in a video clip, this would be it.
Vivi ane
Vivi ane 28 gün önce
@Lawrence Iverson I see what you mean, but the repatriation of native american human remains and artifacts is actually more than a warm feeling on our part. It serves a lot of purposes, wheiter cultural or social. Cultural because some objects are still in use and returning those we have looted can help the community elders to teach the youngest members about their traditions and practices so that they don’t get lost (amongst other things). Social because returning an ancestor home is reinforcing the social cohesion of the group and their ties to their cultural heritage. They want to protect this heritage and us stealing their people and sacred items is robbing them of the power to make their own histories and future. For us, its good practice, but for native communities its preservation and self determination. So yeah, i can argue that the loss of material kept in boxes compared to the preservation of communities’s identity and heritage don’t have the same weight ☺️
Gineen Cooper
Gineen Cooper 29 gün önce
@Lawrence Iverson yes because some objects being returned is not justice for the genocide of 10,000 million native peoples' lives lost.
Lawrence Iverson
Lawrence Iverson Aylar önce
No it wouldn't it would just give you a nice warm feeling of having (at some removes ) done the right thing
Durbar Ghosh
Durbar Ghosh Aylar önce
Just yesterday I visited a museum in Goa, India. It had sculptures from like 12th, 13th, 14th centuries. Surprisingly, almost all had their head missing
Sersa
Sersa 29 gün önce
I'm so glad John did this episode. I'm a curator of provenance and archaeologist seeking to inject more BIPOC and ethical perspectives in curatorship. Provenance is beyond important. Once an item is determined to be stolen or their provenance record is dodgy, we must begin the process of repatriation along with establishing a transparent line of communication with the public our institutions serve and the citizens of the home country where the item is being prepped for return.
John Ericsson
John Ericsson 27 gün önce
Hello how are you
Rhov Anion
Rhov Anion Aylar önce
I studied Native American Anthropology under a Cherokee professor, and one of the things she was involved with (a side hustle, you could say) was seeking to get stolen Native artifacts out of museum basements and back with the tribes. In one case, the museum was being stubborn that "you can't prove we stole this," so my professor tracked down the granddaughter of the woman who made the item (I think it was a ceremonial bead robe or shawl). This tribal elder explained the little tricks her grandmother used that literally no one could have known, things even the museum didn't notice until they inspected even closer, family trade secrets she still used and had taught to her own grandchildren. She made it more than abundantly clear, this belonged to her family. Back in the 1800s, her village was raided and her grandmother gangraped by White men. They ran off with anything they thought looked valuable. This included some of the young girls, livestock, head dresses, furs, and her beadwork outfits. So not only was it stolen, but in a really horrific manner. The museum had bought the majority of their Native American artifacts off a group of rapists. That was not the type of publicity they wanted, so they gave it back. This old lady wore her grandmother's robe at the next dance ceremony. All of this was around 20 years ago, so I hope her grandkids still wear that outfit at ceremonies.
MyKrabi
MyKrabi 6 gün önce
HOLY SHIT - thank you for sharing this powerful story and sad history.
Stoodmuffin Personal
Stoodmuffin Personal 11 gün önce
We should be doing this in Canada, too. But I don't think we will.
WaxonWaxoff
WaxonWaxoff 13 gün önce
Japan is very guilty of this too and unlike the West, don't even admit any of it but straight up drive their entire national rhetoric to play the race card against "evil Americans." _(there's a good reason 1 billion Asians cheered for nuclear emancipation from human experimentation, genocide, massacres, cannibalism, sex slavery, forced labor, Japanese civilian lynch mobs, Japanese civilian settlers kicking people off the land and enslaving them, while 30 million were killed by the Japanese with WMDs like germ and chemical bombs and 2 Japanese nukes in development)_ And even before colonizing Okinawa and appropriating their culture while confiscating all their weapons and imposing an even higher 90% tax rate than people back at home with 70% tax rates which already made, according to 19th century analyst Nobuhiro Satou, 1/3 of peasants killed a baby each year (he even gave specific numbers for each region). _(Calling Karate Japanese is like calling curry English, and it's no wonder Okinawans want independence like Ireland did from the English. Karate was developed to use everyday farming tools like grindstone handles as tonfas and threshing flails as nunchaku, all to disable samurai oppressors' katanas and save their Okinawan families from brutal exploitation and butchering. Lots of basic karate moves make no sense until you realize it's meant to be exercises for tonfas)_ Japan was always a land full of pirates and samurai slavers that weren't content selling their own girls to Portuguese slavers for muskets (but not cannons, they thought cannons were useless until they realized their mistake when they invaded Korea in 1592 and was repelled by Korean cannons and organ guns and missile artillery. They first tried to make their own cannons in 1609) _(Also they had an international slave girl brothel empire from the 1500s to 1900s called Karayuki-san funding their wars, sacrificing their 300,000 girls in the 50 years around 1900 alone for "progress", their slave girl empire even reached as far as India and Australia. It's reviving now too as Japanese economy goes into a 30-year recession and American monetary and tech is finally pulled out of Japan after the Cold War and Japanese can't back their propaganda anymore when they are left to stand on their own)._ No, they had to go around raiding coastal towns all over East Asia for slaves, pottery, gold, and buddhist statues. In fact the Kinzaemon Ido pottery, a national treasure of Japan since the 1500s, is actually discovered to be some Korean peasant's bowl stolen by Japanese slavers. Then they weren't satisfied with that and kidnapped 1000s of potters and technicians to develop Japan's backwards industry and culture in the 1590s invasions of Korea. The Shim SuGwan (Chin Jukan)s are 15 generations of the best potters in Japan who retain their Korean identity to this day and hold annual Korean ceremonies and such. Then of course they stamp their seal on it and sell it overseas as their achievements, which is like if someone came and kidnapped 1000s of bright minds in the Silicon Valley and made them work for them and announce to the world their country is full of geniuses. Japan was forever the backwards island of genocidal samurais killing the Ezo, Hayato, Kumaso, the original native Japanese to extinction without even any native reservations and the Ainu and Ryukyuan and Nivkh and Oroks have fled off of Japanese mainland entirely, and desperate for cultural advances from the continent (even the miitary dictator Tokugawa Shogunate begged Korea to send scholars and artisans to educate them, as "TongShinSa," and had huge parades going through Japan whenever they come every 30 years or so, any more frequent would bankrupt those cities they passed through) and had a deep seated inferiority complex which is why they were so violent and arrogant. In 2012 and 2014, some Koreans forcibly repatriated 2 buddhist statues, just 2 of 60,000 Korean treasures still kept stolen by Japanese pirates in the 1600s and put in display/temples, and were called thieves by the Japanese when they were the ones who stole it for centuries. And even said this "theft" is why they can't return the remaining 60,000 to Korea. Well if they were going to return it, they would have done so centuries ago, and should not have even stolen it in the first place. This is like calling the police the "thieves" when he was just apprehending the real thief and forcibly returning his loot to the rightful owners.
Silver Quill Creative Group
@Willow Snider YES YES and YES - there is so much sexualized violence that happens it’s not surprising when people can’t or won’t believe it. And it’s still happening…
Silver Quill Creative Group
@steve conn 😢
Kat
Kat Aylar önce
I'm an art historian. I'm delighted to see John talking about this topic and so many people being interested in it! His account is very accurate. I'd like to add a few points for context and my personal account of working in the field. On the topic of provenance and disclosure: I personally start all my work with historical (especially foreign) objects with my own provenance research. In my experience, the institutions holding these objects often have little to none founded information - most information displayed is guesswork, which is what art history used to be in the early 20th century: studying art until your eye was so trained that you would identify artefacts based on looking at the design very closely. Today, art history as a scientific discipline holds much more scientific methods of studying objects of course, such as following primary sources to understand the cultural significance and digging through transportation and selling documents to establish provenance. But lack of resources often means that the institutions never paid researchers to revise their information with such contemporary research methods. Mind you, collections can contain tens of thousands of objects - that is work for many, many lifetimes. So straight out the gate, I don't trust the shit white people have written and do my own research against it - as any researcher should. In maybe 8/10 cases I find new information the institution either lacked or willfully omitted, both on provenance and cultural significance. On the topic of storage: It is common everywhere in the world that the collections are much, much bigger than what fits in the exhibition space. This has one very important conservative reason: rotating the objects on display protects them from degradation. Storage spaces are highly monitored and full of tech to help preserve the objects for as long as possible, they are far from dingy basements with moving boxes. Being in the exhibition space and coming in contact with light, humidity etc. ages the objects, which can alter or destroy them. Just to give you some context from the field, which I think by no means invalidates how the situation influences people emotionally, of course. I share John's stance wholeheartedly.
Kyle Kataryn
Kyle Kataryn 3 gün önce
@kat neat. I used to volunteer in the archival dept of our science museum. part of my job was to add the meta data from the assension files. I was quite surprised how much of the collection seemed to be family albums. Anyways, the archive dept was in the basement, so i got to see all the behind the scenes storage. For instance, the diaromas were recreations of literal photographs, so i got to label the exibit locations on thsoe photos as well. I learned the birds on display were sawed in half, because that was the prefered method of display in the 1800s, but now the prefered method is a more natural look, so they all had to be glued back together!
John Ericsson
John Ericsson 27 gün önce
Hello how are you
DrC4Prez
DrC4Prez Aylar önce
"I'm serious, give me a number for how long after his death it's okay to have a part of someone's body sweating in your museum's hot storage. 🤨🤨🤨🤨" Kumail's delivery on that line is unmatched.
utterbullspit
utterbullspit Aylar önce
I didn't think I would be so moved by this episode, but taking people's history and storing it in basements is really one of the most atrocious things that could be done. This really saddened me.
Kyle Kataryn
Kyle Kataryn 3 gün önce
@Emily B. just steal them back. Tell them it's not looting, because they should have taken better care of them.
Emily B.
Emily B. 24 gün önce
@Beaudile Imagine being a looting apologist
Beaudile
Beaudile Aylar önce
You've been gaslighted, I'm afraid to say. If you're really interested in this complex topic, research it a little bit more thoroughly than this so-called comedian and his team have done. They come to you with an agenda and are dealing in propaganda, not facts. Or at the very least, they carefully choose which facts they want to talk about.
γλαύκος Osborne
When I was a kid, I came across a mummy in a museum whose face and feet were opened up to view. The guy had a name, a job description and I was aware that this was not the fate he'd been expecting. Even to this day, I feel very sad for Hor.
Clisedia Gonzalez
Clisedia Gonzalez 22 gün önce
I pray his exposed toes reminds us that we should not disturb the dead, because it is wrong. Rest in peace.
Gineen Cooper
Gineen Cooper 29 gün önce
@matthewpinn4 there's so much sacrilege that's occurred, the river of the night will always be filled with tears of those disrespected.
matthewpinn4
matthewpinn4 29 gün önce
Even worse when you consider Egyptian belief states if your burial is improper you will be doomed to the rivers of the night forever instead of their paradise
qwertyuiopzxcfgh
qwertyuiopzxcfgh Aylar önce
"We can't do the right thing now, or else we'd have to do the right thing again in the future" - the British Museum.
Av 87
Av 87 Aylar önce
@TheForcedMeme; Filthy Papist you mean the empire did everything wrong?. You are a Shameless apologist
schwig44
schwig44 Aylar önce
@Arcadia Berger I don't even want to ask where they got the marble
Arcadia Berger
Arcadia Berger Aylar önce
"We can't do the right thing now, or else we'd have to do the right thing again in the future" - the British Museum. It's very impressive to see that motto carved in marble above the Museum's main entrance.
Oliver Fulayter
Oliver Fulayter Aylar önce
@qwertyuiopzxcfgh I've never heard it put that way but holy shit that's so morbid. Thanks for the now horrifying thing I can say to bum literally anyone out during conversations about capitalism (as if the convo wasn't already a fucking bummer)
schwig44
schwig44 Aylar önce
@qwertyuiopzxcfgh that's individualism. Which capitalism relies upon.
EmilyB Bernard
EmilyB Bernard 22 gün önce
Ty.Oliver again delivers! Imagine a Nigerian field trip that included the Benin bronzes. Imagine the pride of culture. As a child I didn't need to hear about how the Met acquired its art bc I assumed the early antiquities stolen. All cultures need to have them returned asap.
soiung toiue
soiung toiue 22 gün önce
stolen from their community. She was disciplined for trying to help them. I’d love you to do a story about their struggle.
Stef
Stef 17 gün önce
The parody video at the end really puts it into perspective. I believe museums should absolutely display artifacts from around the world-but recreations. Scan or photograph the originals, document materials/ingredients/etc., so it’s preserved. Then, send ALL the originals home. You have a copy & a record, so you’re still in business. Plus, more ppl can see it.
WaxonWaxoff
WaxonWaxoff 13 gün önce
The first Egyptian museum, built in Cairo, was actually built by a French man, Auguste Mariette, who was against Napoleon III's attempts to take Egyptian artifacts to France. He strongly proposed that all Egyptian artifacts must be protected within Egypt.
zwielichtengelchen
zwielichtengelchen Aylar önce
Now I want John to really steal Stonehenge. Or the Eiffel tower. Heck, he can have the Bavaria if he wants to.
Yasser Saadi
Yasser Saadi Aylar önce
I'm an Iraqi and my first time seeing artifacts from Mesopotamia and Egypt was at the Vatican museum.
spornge
spornge Aylar önce
My grandmother found out her grand parents had managed to obtain an Eaglehead dress when she was going through our family storage, she contacted a bunch of people about where it should be probably donated, the museums wanted to not only claim it and planned to put in storage , but were going to fine her for owning it. Keep in mind she was not trying to sell just send it where it should be, thankfully a native American Heritage association got ahold of her and had the legal power to defend their claim on it so it did not end up in a box in a bottom of a basement. It was really gorgoues. I wish I knew where it ended up only that it ended up with a heritage organizaiton.
Frances Mendenhall
Frances Mendenhall 10 gün önce
@Mihovil BeckV you'he been mislead by stereotypes.
WaxonWaxoff
WaxonWaxoff 13 gün önce
Japan is very guilty of this too and unlike the West, don't even admit any of it but straight up drive their entire national rhetoric to play the race card against "evil Americans." _(there's a good reason 1 billion Asians cheered for nuclear emancipation from human experimentation, genocide, massacres, cannibalism, sex slavery, forced labor, Japanese civilian lynch mobs, Japanese civilian settlers kicking people off the land and enslaving them, while 30 million were killed by the Japanese with WMDs like germ and chemical bombs and 2 Japanese nukes in development)_ And even before colonizing Okinawa and appropriating their culture while confiscating all their weapons and imposing an even higher 90% tax rate than people back at home with 70% tax rates which already made, according to 19th century analyst Nobuhiro Satou, 1/3 of peasants killed a baby each year (he even gave specific numbers for each region). _(Calling Karate Japanese is like calling curry English, and it's no wonder Okinawans want independence like Ireland did from the English. Karate was developed to use everyday farming tools like grindstone handles as tonfas and threshing flails as nunchaku, all to disable samurai oppressors' katanas and save their Okinawan families from brutal exploitation and butchering. Lots of basic karate moves make no sense until you realize it's meant to be exercises for tonfas)_ Japan was always a land full of pirates and samurai slavers that weren't content selling their own girls to Portuguese slavers for muskets (but not cannons, they thought cannons were useless until they realized their mistake when they invaded Korea in 1592 and was repelled by Korean cannons and organ guns and missile artillery. They first tried to make their own cannons in 1609) _(Also they had an international slave girl brothel empire from the 1500s to 1900s called Karayuki-san funding their wars, sacrificing their 300,000 girls in the 50 years around 1900 alone for "progress", their slave girl empire even reached as far as India and Australia. It's reviving now too as Japanese economy goes into a 30-year recession and American monetary and tech is finally pulled out of Japan after the Cold War and Japanese can't back their propaganda anymore when they are left to stand on their own)._ No, they had to go around raiding coastal towns all over East Asia for slaves, pottery, gold, and buddhist statues. In fact the Kinzaemon Ido pottery, a national treasure of Japan since the 1500s, is actually discovered to be some Korean peasant's bowl stolen by Japanese slavers. Then they weren't satisfied with that and kidnapped 1000s of potters and technicians to develop Japan's backwards industry and culture in the 1590s invasions of Korea. The Shim SuGwan (Chin Jukan)s are 15 generations of the best potters in Japan who retain their Korean identity to this day and hold annual Korean ceremonies and such. Then of course they stamp their seal on it and sell it overseas as their achievements, which is like if someone came and kidnapped 1000s of bright minds in the Silicon Valley and made them work for them and announce to the world their country is full of geniuses. Japan was forever the backwards island of genocidal samurais killing the Ezo, Hayato, Kumaso, the original native Japanese to extinction without even any native reservations and the Ainu and Ryukyuan and Nivkh and Oroks have fled off of Japanese mainland entirely, and desperate for cultural advances from the continent (even the miitary dictator Tokugawa Shogunate begged Korea to send scholars and artisans to educate them, as "TongShinSa," and had huge parades going through Japan whenever they come every 30 years or so, any more frequent would bankrupt those cities they passed through) and had a deep seated inferiority complex which is why they were so violent and arrogant. In 2012 and 2014, some Koreans forcibly repatriated 2 buddhist statues, just 2 of 60,000 Korean treasures still kept stolen by Japanese pirates in the 1600s and put in display/temples, and were called thieves by the Japanese when they were the ones who stole it for centuries. And even said this "theft" is why they can't return the remaining 60,000 to Korea. Well if they were going to return it, they would have done so centuries ago, and should not have even stolen it in the first place. This is like calling the police the "thieves" when he was just apprehending the real thief and forcibly returning his loot to the rightful owners.
nds711D
nds711D Aylar önce
@MTguy1 Boozh. I never said everything was stolen, I said everything that was stolen should be returned. Also, it's never too late to reconnect with your tribe and culture, if that's something you want to do.
MTguy1
MTguy1 Aylar önce
@nds711D I'm a card carrying Native too and it's dishonest to conclude that everything museums have was "stolen" despite the assertion there are natives who don't care and never cared particularly about items that belonged to other members. Someone else's headdress being worth a new rifle in trade happened every day and we all know it. Also for every "tradition" following tribe member there's 10 who pay lip service at best. Admittedly I'm an apple of course so what I've seen and experienced over 40 years doesn't fit the narrative. . . .
Cruznick06
Cruznick06 Aylar önce
@Mihovil BeckV Are you serious? Not only is your assumption that the heritage foundation wouldn't care about its significance disgusting, you are wholly denying any possible spiritual or religious significance of the item as well. Do you think a crucifix from the 1800's should never be displayed just because it is old? What about a rosary that's a family heirloom? Should it never be used in prayer?
Lizzie
Lizzie 14 gün önce
The one argument I can think of regarding certain artifacts not being returned would be to countries either run by or with a strong presence of terrorists since many terror groups specifically target cultural heritage sites and museums, purposefully destroying history and artifacts. I think that aside from those very extreme instances, it’s important to return items blatantly stolen. One of the better ideas I can think of is how King Tut’s mummy traveled to a variety of different museums and went on display all across the world. If museums really want to bring people together then they should begin fostering working relationships museums across the globe and establishing a practice of borrowing and lending artifacts to one another for a set amount of time. I know that’s obviously not as easy it sounds since you never know what might happen during transport and if a government might get involved holding artifacts hostage at customs for months on end in crappy conditions, but I think this would be the best way for the most people to be able to experience all of these artifacts and to do so in a mutually beneficial and respectful way.
JAGUAR
JAGUAR 10 gün önce
How about India then? Its literally 3rd strongest nation and has more budget for its history and is stable too.
Alok nr
Alok nr Aylar önce
What a sublime episode. Especially that ending.
Mark Frieser
Mark Frieser Aylar önce
Every time I go running in Central Park and see the Egyptian obelisk in the park, I’m reminded of our theft of ancient antiquities. Why we haven’t given them back decades ago is beyond me.
Dm👉@jaylenosGarage2 on telegram
👆👆Big fan, thanks for commenting, you have been selected among our lucky winner. send me a message on tegram.🎊🎉
Sushant Manandhar
Sushant Manandhar 6 gün önce
I knew someone who used to work in the British Museum and let me tell you, what they hide in their vaults are much more valuable than what they show off
Wanax Digammes
Wanax Digammes Aylar önce
Fun fact about the Elgin Marbles: After the British Museum refused to return them on the grounds that Greece didn’t have a proper place to display them, they built the state of the art modern Acropolis Museum in Athens for the chief purpose of housing the Elgin Marbles. They still refuse to send them back. Also, when Lord Elgin was transporting the marbles to Britain, the ship they were on sank, and the marbles had to be salvaged from the ocean floor.
Efstathios Dimopoulos
@PASTAFARIANS, UNITE! Jesus saves but I spend (alot)
TheOtherSideOfLife
TheOtherSideOfLife 9 gün önce
@Seattle_dude you mean, why should they return a literal piece of a country's history to said country? Please do read this sentence again and see for yourself. If I took something that belongs to you, wouldn't I be obliged to give it back to you?
doublepinger
doublepinger Aylar önce
Greece requires handouts to keep its people from eating dirt. They're literally not capable of taking care of living people, let alone their artifacts. Good grief.
Blacklight Redlight
@Jesus Saves! God prefers an atheist. Atheists use morality based on what's good, instead of threatening people with hellfire all day.
NoBody
NoBody Aylar önce
The ship didn’t sink itself 👀
Daniel Knapp
Daniel Knapp Aylar önce
I could see the payback museum actually being possible. Or even a reverse Indiana Jones series where they steal national relics from America and Europe and put them in museums in those other countries. After which they can be traded for the stolen relics taken centuries ago.
Wanderer101
Wanderer101 Aylar önce
I love history and I love museums but if this is the lengths that we have to go to in order to educate people the building honestly deserves to be empty.
Tams Martin
Tams Martin 28 gün önce
I adore the payback museum almost more than anything I have seen before, the only thing missing was the room of queens corgis I was half expecting.
miou joer
miou joer Aylar önce
I know this is a comedic news show but i couldn’t stop crying… they stole everything about us
Greg Hodges
Greg Hodges Aylar önce
One thing John didn't mention was how much more stolen art is hidden away in private collections. These people often have deeper pockets and less hesitation to acquiring art with a "dubious" ownership history.
Clisedia Gonzalez
Clisedia Gonzalez 22 gün önce
Ownership? The ones that loot and pay? Return to the source the heirs, not the thieves.
Lawrence Iverson
Lawrence Iverson Aylar önce
@Dr. Zoidberg SO, all private collectors are "weirdos" You kids sure get judgemental sometimes.
doublepinger
doublepinger Aylar önce
Stop people from hoarding art... it's your fault. Let people keep their art and they sell it or destroy it... your fault. White people are truly the cause of everything bad.
Bonhommierr
Bonhommierr Aylar önce
To all the people commenting on how it's irrelevant to museums : it is. Museums often have sizeable parts of their collections gifted/donated/loaned for exhibitions out of this type of collections. Or they are funded either partially or totally by rich collectors, who sometimes even open up private (but open to the public) museums of their own. It's often a way to feel less guilty, or attract prestige, or acquire an image of a public benefactor, or just sometimes to have the collection acquire more value by being published in catalogues and seen by the public before being sold at auction. In and of itself, it can be an issue but isn't in most cases (where state-funded museums basically are co-opted for private interests it's actually dubious). The true problem is when said art is looted art, as for pretty obvious reasons it acquires more value and collectors become either less willing to part with it, or will hide it, or in, extreme cases, will sell it back for a hefty price to the country of origin. China has this unofficial policy of having billionaires buy looted Chinese artefacts at auction, which might seem cool but actually feeds the market, which then hungers for more, say looted artefacts from the Middle East...
EmpyreanLightASMR
EmpyreanLightASMR Aylar önce
Makes you wonder what some super rich "good" guys might even own. Like Dwayne Johnson. I have no idea but now I'm curious.
BRAINBUZZ
BRAINBUZZ Aylar önce
Kumail's delivery had me in stitches! That was so good.
lior yunfh
lior yunfh Aylar önce
When James Acaster did that bit about the British Museum saying "No, we're not done looking at it", I didn't realise he was just pretty much literally quoting them.
John Waldo
John Waldo Aylar önce
Fantastic episode. Keep doing what you’re doing y’all, you’re immensely talented and needed!❤
Simeson
Simeson Aylar önce
The way the experts are defending keeping their loot. Imagine a common thief talking that way about their stolen goods, lol.
Background Ambience
This reminds me a lot of the Irish Giant Charles Byrne. He was 7' 7'' and he was so afraid of a collector or museum displaying his body when he died that he had his friends bury him at sea. Unfortunately, before his friends could follow through with their promise his corpse was stolen by a 'collector' and was eventually sold to the Royal College of Surgeons in London. It is still on display there over 200 years later despite efforts by activists for him to be buried. People with the same genetic condition as Byrne, who are from the same part of the country as him and probably share DNA have offered to donate their skeletons when they die so that Byrne can be released, but the museum has always refused.
WaxonWaxoff
WaxonWaxoff 13 gün önce
So glad the Irish finally found independence from the ruthless English. Wish the same for the Okinawan Independence movement. 4 centuries of being butchered by samurai oppressors for 90% tax rates (Japanese mainland had 75% average and it was already driving droves of mothers to kill their own babies in what's called MABIKI because they can't afford to feed them. 19th century analyst Nobuhiro Satou even gave specific numbers for each region and said 1/3 of peasant houses kill a baby each year) and having all their weapons confiscated made the Okinawans develop Karate using everyday farming tools (grindstone handles became the Tonfa, threshing flaisl became the Nunchaku, etc., and lots of Karate moves make no sense until you realize they are exercises to use with these farming tools in ways to disable samurai oppressors' katanas) But Japan stole that too, selling it as their own martial arts overseas. While within Japan, Okinawans were used as cannon fodder and gaslighted to blow themselves up for emperor hirohito who is supposedly the one true god all must pray towards his Tokyo palace every day and promised to be sent to Zen Buddhist paradise upon dying in battle. Then they gaslighted that Americans will eat and violate their children so upon losing the war, they were told to kill their children themselves to spare them the fate, and follow in suit with seppuku. When American forces landed, Okinawans were surprised they only received food and medicine, and discovered it was the Japanese who tortured raped and sent the Okinawan children to die as cannon fodder to American guns, and wept tears of blood at the graves of the children they were gaslighted to kill. One such group of schoolgirls, the Himeyuri Students, were sent to die for Japan so Japan can say "Look how brutal the evil Americans were in killing these (not) Japanese girls!" There's a good reason 1 billion Asians cheered for American nukes emancipating them from Japanese slavery, sex slavery, forced labor, Japanese civilian lynch mobs, Japanese civilian settlers kicking people off the land and enslaving them, human experimentation, cannibalism, 30 million massacred, human experimentation on fetus formed from forced impregnation of schoolgirls, and WMDs like anthrax germ bombs and mustard gas chemical bombs dropped on Asian cities for 30 years, plus 2 nukes they were developing right to the end of the war. Not even Nazis used WMDs in war.
Christina Grant
Christina Grant Aylar önce
Time for someone to steal a corpse to honor a dead man's wish.
jess gunn
jess gunn Aylar önce
@Carin Jacobsson no this was the big one in the national museum a few years back, they had some replica pieces sure but it included all the real pieces that they had been holding in storage as well
Carin Jacobsson
Carin Jacobsson Aylar önce
​@jess gunn Wasn't that the exhibition with replicas though? I know a Tutankhamun exhibition with repIicas has toured around.
Charles Cummings Sr
@K BEVERLEE I meant the world. All areas of the world there is bigotry based on race, religion, localities, sex, etc.
Jess Dixon
Jess Dixon Aylar önce
Just make elaborate replicas of everything and give the original back. And if you are really worried about them not being able to take care if it properly, help them create facilities and standards of care.
Kuti Cutie
Kuti Cutie Aylar önce
One of the best John Oliver episodes in recent times for sure...
John Ericsson
John Ericsson 24 gün önce
Hello how are you
Sonia’s Way
Sonia’s Way Aylar önce
Lets all appreciate that HBO puts all LWT episodes in almost their entirety for free on youtube without a shitton of ads.
Maggie Pie
Maggie Pie Aylar önce
When it comes to the art of constricting an empire, Hitler learned quite a few things from the British and the French, such as the nessecity of removing a country's own history when establishing your rule.
SATISH PRADHAN
SATISH PRADHAN Aylar önce
Fun fact the word loot is a Hindi / Sanskrit (Indian language) word. So the British looted so much that they even took the word loot which the people cried when they were looting.
Arati Prasad
Arati Prasad Aylar önce
@docvideo93 Yes it does have the same meaning.
canvaspants
canvaspants Aylar önce
Sadly there is a Korean word for golden treasure, nodaji, which originally came from English “no touch” yelled at those pesky locals getting in the way of that loot
NoBody
NoBody Aylar önce
You can’t loot language unless you’re drinking the hate kool aid. The haterade.
js2010ish
js2010ish Aylar önce
😮
DogsRNice
DogsRNice Aylar önce
@Organic Farm they all originate from proto indo-european which is what nearly every language with a few exceptions from Europe to India come from Also lone words are interesting, for example "anime" (meaning Japanese animation) is a lone word from Japanese (which means just any animation), except it's also a lone word from the English word... animation, just without the "tion" So it's a lone word of a lone word, which was originally basically itself Also one may think that the word emoji has a similar origin but it's actually just a coincidence that it kinda sounds like it partly came from "emotion" From Wikipedia, "Originally meaning pictograph, the word emoji comes from Japanese e (絵, 'picture') + moji (文字, 'character'); the resemblance to the English words emotion and emoticon is purely coincidental."
SnuggleBunny
SnuggleBunny Aylar önce
Watched this via watching a Twitch streamer watch it and comment on it, so I’m not gonna watch it all over again… but I must go out of my way to click it, to give it a like, and comment!: This is such a good piece. Really fleshed out the logic and reasonings for both sides of the “debate” and, obviously, your show is supposed to convey serious issues in a humorous way, and you did it absolutely wonderfully. Thank you for opening my eyes. 🙏
Geoffrey Waldo
Geoffrey Waldo 22 gün önce
I worked on the Parthenon and other artifact conservation efforts. A serious concern: accelerated deterioration due to modern man made changes to atmospheric chemistry would result in complete erosion of surface features in a few decades. If the orphaned artifacts are repatriated, they and host substrates must be conserved and maintained in a stable environment if the long-term stability is a goal.
Omkar Chavan
Omkar Chavan 7 gün önce
What if long term stability is not the goal but knowing and feeling connected to one's own culture's history is?
Karl Naidoo
Karl Naidoo 5 gün önce
this was a fantastic episode😭 The way he and the writers of the show phased their discussion on why this is such an important step to decolonization was reasoned out so amazingly clearly and ethically and wow mahn just hits me in the feels
Belly Laugher
Belly Laugher Aylar önce
❤That was soooooo well done. Thanks for all the facts, info, humor & the finale.❤Brass panels, Native American "artifacts" & Eastern, Asian religious "objects" especially impactful to me. (James Acaster did an excellent piece on England's looting in his 2018 Netflix show "Repertoire"➡hilarious, but w/such glaring pith 🎯.)
rebecca long
rebecca long Aylar önce
The way that woman smiles as she patronizes, is chilling.
Nusaibah Ibraheem
Nusaibah Ibraheem 24 gün önce
Humans can have excuse for anything. They can quiet literally justify any atrocities.
MondayNightBallroom
MondayNightBallroom 27 gün önce
Let's not ignore that she's American, so she also stole that accent.
Edriss Scofield
Edriss Scofield 29 gün önce
I don't think he cares that they don't care and just uses it for his own amusement
Randy C
Randy C Aylar önce
It's some real sociopathic shit.
M W
M W Aylar önce
So arrogant that woman! The Brits stole the artifacts!
MaiAolei
MaiAolei 6 gün önce
This issue gets really complicated when the artefacts are still, geographically, in their area of creation, but under the stewardship of the descendants of the genocidal conquerors that wiped out, or nearly wiped out, their creators. Examples here include ... the entire American continent. I bet the descendants of the creators of those artefacts would love to have those artefacts back, but maybe even more pressingly they would love to have some actual sovereign place they can call home to put those artefacts in. Try that on for size: Demand to return stolen ancestral lands along with stolen ancestral objects ...
Robert DeMitro
Robert DeMitro 22 gün önce
I love the " Pay Back Museum " so true to everything John Oliver was saying . The skit just solidifies everything being said !
MissCephalopod
MissCephalopod 10 gün önce
I'm amazed that John didn't even mention how when the Elgin marbles were taken from Greece in the early 1800s, one of the ships sank underway, leaving the marbles underwater for 2 years until their recovery. So while people are arguing that taking the marbles was "saving them" from the incompetence of their own culture, the first thing the British did was let them sink to the bottom of the fucking ocean. If only the Greeks had known that marine submersion was such a vital part of properly caring for one's treasured material heritage!
Ayush Paudel
Ayush Paudel 20 gün önce
I was seriously shocked by looking at Chicago Institute of Art's Nepalese collection. Thank you for bringing attention to this.
Kedo
Kedo Aylar önce
Greek person here: our conservation methods are actually very advanced. I attended a seminar a few years ago where a specialist actually went into detail about the methods they use to conserve and preserve the marbles. A lot of time and effort is put into researching the best ways to care for our artefacts, something that can’t be said for the British museum.
Miguel Almeida
Miguel Almeida 14 gün önce
@icecube don't bother with @Thane's Games Another user already pretty much debunked everything he wrote by the detail
Danny Danhammer
Danny Danhammer Aylar önce
@Mervyn Greene lol So after saving a beaten neglected child return them without consideration of environs now that mom is homeless but out jail...? When something is taken due to importance case should be a factor in returning the item. What good is returning an object that will just be destroyed. Might as well just keep it then.
Butterme Pancake
Butterme Pancake Aylar önce
@Mervyn Greene they belong in the museums now
Mervyn Greene
Mervyn Greene Aylar önce
@Butterme Pancake So, now that the war is over, will they give these items back?
Butterme Pancake
Butterme Pancake Aylar önce
@Mervyn Greene again the were rescued really from war in horrible conditions and put somewhere they can be enjoyed. It's time to enjoy and learn from history now.
A Thousand Oaks
A Thousand Oaks Aylar önce
Very good and important episode! There is a problem though that has been left out here, that I read about a while ago, that is that in some cases objects belong to ethnical groups that aren't actually properly represented (or sometimes even suppressed) by the governments of the present day nation states that are in their place, so that negotiations about returns with their "home country" governments are actually a little besides the interest of the group of people that should actually be posessing them.
cyn_kawaii
cyn_kawaii 9 gün önce
I’m glad you’re talking about this because Peru has always taken great care of what’s in their museums and us Peruvians don’t even get access to see this because the British visa process is extremely hard, assuming you can even afford to fly. Artifacts should be back with their countries. As a Peruvian, I would love to see peru receive its artifacts and gold back from these European countries
Sean Inness
Sean Inness Aylar önce
This reminds me of the stories of the last native Tasmanians. Truganini begged the authorities for a respectful burial and requested that her ashes be scattered in the D'Entrecasteaux Channel. She feared that her body would be mutilated for perverse scientific purposes as William Lanne's had been. ( The Royal College of Surgeons of England and the Royal Society of Tasmania argued over who should possess his remains). Anyway, Truganini's remains were on public display until 1947 and her wishes were not honored until 1976, almost 100 years after her death. BUTTTTTT in 2002 they found her hair and skin was still at The Royal College of Surgeons of England. It's been reported that these remains were also, finally, returned to Tasmania for burial. Horrific.
Naxster
Naxster Aylar önce
"we absolutly cannot give those priceless artifacts away to a museum in less developed country, we have no way of knowing f they will take good care of them. Anyways, we are selling those stolen artifacts, biding open to anyone willing to pay upwards of 3 millions"
Hermes Psychopompos
Hermes Psychopompos 17 gün önce
Oliver, the British accused my Greek Government for the fact we don't have a proper museum. Now that we build the most amazing and modern one, they invented an other excuse. You should refer to Caryatids. 3 out of 4 are in Greek Meuseum and the 4th is missing. They arranged the Caryatids in such a marvelous way in order to point out, to make clear the missing one. At the very least, they British Meuseum made a lot of money. They could compensate Greece at least. Keep them but 1/3 of the earning should be going to Greece. Greece were paying the British for the loan we took for our war of independence against Ottoman Empire for over 100 years. Lately we finished repaying. Now it's your turn some of the earning to be coming back.
xxcatcannonxx
xxcatcannonxx Aylar önce
What with today being Indigenous People's Day (Oct. 12th), and the recent news of the University of Kansas having over *500* funerary objects and body parts, this story and especially the ending hit home for me. As a member of the Navajo Nation, this university still having remains of my and other tribes' ancestors 30 years after the Native American Graves and Repatriation Act is beyond egregious. I don't have the words to express how furious this makes me, and how frustrating it is to have your ancestors, your family, in a box hundreds of miles from their homeland.
nkr dinla
nkr dinla Aylar önce
I hate this show it sucks. Please leave me alone. Please.
Brian DeLeonard
Brian DeLeonard Aylar önce
Honest question: Are there in some cases valid concerns about whether the home country will preserve them properly?
Timothy Libeer
Timothy Libeer 2 gün önce
Love you John! Everyone at LWT needs a raise. Please keep it coming.
kurtilein3
kurtilein3 Aylar önce
I love art, and i collect it, and because i know many such stories, i buy from living artists. Modern and contemporary art. In most cases i personally met the artist, in many cases i have seen them work and personally handed them the money. In all cases i know the artist did not suffer from instances of theft or anything like that. Provinence is often me and the artist, or me, the artist, and a gallery that works closely with the artist, so closely that he or she is present. And doing fine, and being alive. Feels odd to have to add this, but with the skull or a limb in a box the artist is also present. Thanks John Oliver for having me point out that when i say the artist is present when i first see and later buy an artwork, the artist is present does not mean a skull in a box.
Benjamin P
Benjamin P Aylar önce
Just saw the US returned some Benin Bronzes to Nigeria. Willing to bet this episode played a part in that. I can't even imagine the work that goes into making this show every week but I can damn sure appreciate it.
JRK
JRK Aylar önce
Technically something is "lost" when it is either or both: - no longer in one's own possession (this criterion is sometimes insufficient by itself) - one has not or cannot determine the current location of the item (this criterion is sufficient by itself) Thus this also covers items that are stolen (forcibly, such as in pillaging or robbery, or through burglary, aka "stealth thievery")... even if you know who stole it.
FeelGoodInc
FeelGoodInc 23 gün önce
Whenever I learn about things like this, I think about how right-wingers call themselves "redpilled" which is supposed to mean awakening to the reality of what the world is really like, but when they use it, it really just means that nothing is wrong with anything and that their racist grandparents were right about everything all along.
TimeBucks
TimeBucks Aylar önce
love the idea of a Payback Museum
Chris maskiew
Chris maskiew 29 gün önce
Brilliant
Nashemon
Nashemon Aylar önce
How much you pay for bots?
Neture Creator
Neture Creator Aylar önce
Timebucks is very great.
Neture Creator
Neture Creator Aylar önce
Great
Razia Akter
Razia Akter Aylar önce
Nice
Giannis Veronis
Giannis Veronis Aylar önce
As a Greek I feel very offended by the argument of the British govermemt of not being able to maintain my Ancient Heritage in my Home Country. Shame on you for that GB
Nditah Samweld
Nditah Samweld Aylar önce
Thank you, John Oliver (HBO) for this greatest informative piece of all time.
Dai Jones
Dai Jones 24 gün önce
Keep up the great work Mr Oliver. There seem to be few methods of countering the ghastly propaganda of the right other than derision. You are doing that extremely well and should be applauded for your efforts
Max Ruedy
Max Ruedy Aylar önce
Your show is priceless.Thanks John
Ian Wellinghurst
Ian Wellinghurst Aylar önce
I met some members of the Lakota Nation a few years back. They told me that one of the leaders in the community, Mama Jules, was Crazy Horse's granddaughter, and that she had been trying for years to get his war jacket/vest back from the Smithsonian. The Smithsonian just kept delaying and giving bogus answers for why it could not be returned. All of these cases take on a greater level of frustration when you hear the personal stories of the folk the items were taken from.
WaxonWaxoff
WaxonWaxoff 13 gün önce
Japan is very guilty of this too and unlike the West, don't even admit any of it but straight up drive their entire national rhetoric to play the race card against "evil Americans." _(there's a good reason 1 billion Asians cheered for nuclear emancipation from human experimentation, genocide, massacres, cannibalism, sex slavery, forced labor, while 30 million were killed by the Japanese with WMDs like germ and chemical bombs and 2 Japanese nukes in development)_ And even before colonizing Okinawa and appropriating their culture while confiscating all their weapons and imposing an even higher 90% tax rate than people back at home with 70% tax rates which already made, according to 19th century analyst Nobuhiro Satou, 1/3 of peasants killed a baby each year (he even gave specific numbers for each region). _(Calling Karate Japanese is like calling curry English, and it's no wonder Okinawans want independence like Ireland did from the English. Karate was developed to use everyday farming tools like grindstone handles as tonfas and threshing flails as nunchaku, all to disable samurai oppressors' katanas and save their Okinawan families from brutal exploitation and butchering. Lots of basic karate moves make no sense until you realize it's meant to be exercises for tonfas)_ Japan was always a land full of pirates and samurai slavers that weren't content selling their own girls to Portuguese slavers for muskets (but not cannons, they thought cannons were useless until they realized their mistake when they invaded Korea in 1592 and was repelled by Korean cannons and organ guns and missile artillery. They first tried to make their own cannons in 1609) _(Also they had an international slave girl brothel empire from the 1500s to 1900s called Karayuki-san funding their wars, sacrificing their 300,000 girls in the 50 years around 1900 alone for "progress", their slave girl empire even reached as far as India and Australia. It's reviving now too as Japanese economy goes into a 30-year recession and American monetary and tech is finally pulled out of Japan after the Cold War and Japanese can't back their propaganda anymore when they are left to stand on their own)._ No, they had to go around raiding coastal towns all over East Asia for slaves, pottery, gold, and buddhist statues. In fact the Kinzaemon Ido pottery, a national treasure of Japan since the 1500s, is actually discovered to be some Korean peasant's bowl stolen by Japanese slavers. Then they weren't satisfied with that and kidnapped 1000s of potters and technicians to develop Japan's backwards industry and culture in the 1590s invasions of Korea. The Shim SuGwan (Chin Jukan)s are 15 generations of the best potters in Japan who retain their Korean identity to this day and hold annual Korean ceremonies and such. Then of course they stamp their seal on it and sell it overseas as their achievements, which is like if someone came and kidnapped 1000s of bright minds in the Silicon Valley and made them work for them and announce to the world their country is full of geniuses. Japan was forever the backwards island of genocidal samurais killing the Ezo, Hayato, Kumaso, the original native Japanese to extinction without even any native reservations and the Ainu and Ryukyuan and Nivkh and Oroks have fled off of Japanese mainland entirely, and desperate for cultural advances from the continent (even the Tokugawa Shogunate begging Korea for scholars and artisans to educate them and had huge parades going through Japan whenever they came) and had a deep seated inferiority complex which is why they were so violent and arrogant. In 2012 and 2014, some Koreans forcibly repatriated 2 buddhist statues, just 2 of 60,000 Korean treasures still kept stolen by Japanese pirates in the 1600s and put in display/temples, and were called thieves by the Japanese when they were the ones who stole it for centuries. And even said this "theft" is why they can't return the remaining 60,000 to Korea. Well if they were going to return it, they would have done so centuries ago, and should not have even stolen it in the first place. This is like calling the police the "thieves" when he was just apprehending the real thief and forcibly returning his loot to the rightful owners.
Danemr Reschke
Danemr Reschke Aylar önce
@Jalashuk Inc I never said "western" museums. I said museums. If a tribe has a building that can properly maintain the artifacts and is free from political strife then sure. But giving artifacts to individuals is just turning history into a dinner table story and an eventual episode of "antiques roadshow", if it survives at all. The Benin bronzes are in the process of getting returned once museums are built to house them, but the fact that they were spoils of war kind of just adds to my point. The British museum saved the artifacts, not from Nigeria, but from the British soldiers who took them. Because, as I said above, individuals suck at caring for history.
Jalashuk Inc
Jalashuk Inc Aylar önce
@Danemr Reschke So conceded. Do you know we have museums? Tribal people have means to protect and hold sacred items of cultural value. We did it long before western culture. This goes for other cultures too, you don't think Nigerians could maintain the Benin bronzes? They were maintaining them just fine before they were pilfered. The snooty conceit that western museums are the only safe havens of culture is the problem here.
Eve Golding
Eve Golding Aylar önce
@Franklin did you even watch the video?
Heháka Kohana Runs With Bears
I thought you might be interested in knowing this but Mama Jules is specifically Huɳkpapa Lakȟóta. Contrary to the misinformation that has been spread even amongst even in supposedly accurate historical "records" of us, and amongst Lakȟóta people who grow up off ancestral land, the Lakȟóta Nation is made up of 7 allied Tribes. Traditionally, our ancestral land goes into a large swath of what's now Canada directly northward from an area a bit past what's now South Dakota (which is spelled and pronounced as I've described originally, our languages differ and they as with the Nakhóta are not Lakȟóta, but closely related small Tribes nearby) through Manitobah, not just a small area of the plains of the US. 70% of our land and 90% of our reservations are in Canada, which is only really known to Canadians. (people don't like to talk about how Nations and Tribes were split by borders.) The genocide of the Lakoȟta language (and dialects) and variation in culture by white colonizers has lead to even a lot of our people not knowing the correct pronunciation of our nation. i am full Lakȟóta (half Oglála and half Huɳkpapa), from Pine Ridge Reservation where mostly Oglála live, and my father is from Standing Rock that's mostly Huɳkpapa. I am the first generation in my lineage that has ever moved off of what is now a reservation, and was raised by my grandfather who was in his 80s that didn't speak English and thus Lakoȟta is my first language. It's hard to find speakers online because, due to cultural erasure, the average age of Lakoȟta speaker is 70, and the life expectancy is 55 on the reservation I'm from. The Lakȟóta language and culture are dying, rapidly, and in our culture, keeping our history is incredibly important, and my duty to my people, ancestral and present, is to give as much digestible information I can to anyone who I think might care, and care to help me correct the misinformation that's been perpetuated for far too long. We are too few to do it on our own, and need allies and people who care who are not us to be informed. I hope this finds you well. Love from the Lakȟóta Nation Mitákuye oya'síŋ ✊🏾
Emilie Granqvist
Emilie Granqvist 4 gün önce
Just a friendly reminder that there are opposing view points from these segments that are equally valid. This show is very good at presenting their point of view in a very compelling way but simultaneously fails to give the opposing side any real attention. I know that he often mentions opposing arguments but when he dose those arguments are cherry picked to be the least compelling once and the segments are presented in such a way for viewers to immediately dismiss them. In this case I think that there are good arguments for both sides. On one hand it is sad that some countries do not get to own all of their own heritage. But on the other hand we cannot turn back the clock on what happened over a 100 years ago. The people that stole the artifacts are long dead and the artifacts have since been bought and sold many times. Their current owners has acquired the items in legitimate ways and should not have to be punished when they have done nothing wrong. And arguably you cannot legally claim that something has been stolen by a dead person a 100 years ago on behalf of your dead ancestors specially since the laws and customs of those times where completely different from today.
dcamron46
dcamron46 Aylar önce
Kumail absolutely nailed it - as usual!! 😂😂
Luboman411
Luboman411 Aylar önce
Well, the easy answer here is to give the stuff back to their rightful owners and then have artists (preferably native) do recreations of the repatriated stuff to then display in the museums. Let's be honest, 99.99999% of museum-goers won't be able to tell the difference. But the real issue here, that is never said aloud by the museums, is money. The real, legitimate stuff is worth oodles of moolah. Institutions like the British Museum are defending their assets. If they give away the Benin bronzes to Nigeria and the Elgin marbles to Greece, it means the museum loses almost $1 billion in assets it could sell off sometime in the future. It does NOT want to do that. So it holds onto this stuff for as long as possible. It's all about the benjamins, once again.
Noraset Rerkkachornkiat
I salute you Oliver to boldly voice out this perpetual preposterous and ludicrous denials from British museum to return those artifacts to where they belong. The British empire is long dusted in our bygone history so what is the right for them to not releasing the national treasures back to their native countries!
Adultish Gambino
Adultish Gambino Aylar önce
“We can’t return your art and culture because otherwise we wouldn’t have our own” is the most depressingly hilarious line I’ve ever heard.
Caleb McIntosh
Caleb McIntosh Aylar önce
I mean, since the history of Britain is a history of conquest and theft, it makes sense in a tortured way...
j k
j k Aylar önce
I mean thees people don't even have their own cuisine. Are we surprised that they are throwing temper tantrums with these stolen antiquities?
Tepid Ceranda
Tepid Ceranda Aylar önce
@Oliver Fulayter The entire point is that ancient Egypt =/= modern Egypt. Suggesting they're "owed" those artifacts because they came from their country thousands of years ago is utter nonsense. It's only being brought up now because anti-anglo rhetoric is at an all-time high. There are plenty of articles covering the mishandling of artifacts in Egypt if you took one second to google it but you wont and you're set on a single mindset.
Oliver Fulayter
Oliver Fulayter Aylar önce
@Tepid Ceranda I re-went through the stuff and can agree you haven't moved the post since you've never established one. I do need to ask what you mean about the Egyptians not being able to preserve their stuff as you've so claimed. Any papers on that if you will, please. If we are talking about the same Egypt, I'm pretty sure they're actually Famous for the historical preservation they've done up to this point. Kinda like, their whole thing if I remember correctly. I would also like to see where your claims of the Nazis being historical accountants comes from as well. It's well known that one of the main things about Nazis were their attempt to fully genocide a culture and their practicing peoples. At least when it came to the Jews in particular, I don't believe preserving their history was the second next thing on the German's mind. I am to believe that they kind of wanted to erase the Jewish people and culture entirely. Like, are you claiming they preserved things of their own past and history? The things they already had in their museums and already owned? I believe it's also well known that Hitler was into the arts, so I can see you staking a claim from that line of thinking. As @M.S said, I'm sure the Nazis did realize the historical value and importance of keeping artifacts and preserving the history of what was already there. Once again I can assure you, the Nazis are most notoriously known for wanting to remove an entire people and culture off the face of the Earth. Not for wanting to preserve precious history unless it had to do with themselves. If we move on from there, MS brings up feeling that if the Nazis were wiling to start a World War, it means they were always willing to destroy places of significance and artifacts to go along with it. Which brings me to you prompting about the statues in the US being pulled down. Could you explain to me the leading of Nazis to this line of thinking? As well as please explain your use of quotations around the word, "problematic," when using said example. As this makes it seem you are in support of celebrating a horrifically oppressive past that liked people to own people instead of just seeing the statue of a figure of cultural significance that the people of today can learn and grow from. I just would love to know and understand your goals on this comment section, as I feel like I am here to deepen the conversation and learn more from those around me. See what interesting things I could stumble across and maybe add in my two cents to keep the conversation going. From my perspective, you've seemed to have come down here to just make people mad and not really add into anything. You've made bold claims with no backup or even really an explanation to what you've said. So please, please tell me what you mean by any of what you are doing.
nicole
nicole Aylar önce
Okay, so let’s presume the Egyptians don’t take care of their historical artifacts very well. How is that grounds for the nearest English-speaking white dude to take them lol? How does that make it any of your goddamn business? If your neighbor doesn’t take great care of their lawn, do you get to just decide it’s part of your property one day? Some white nonsense right there.
alt left
alt left Aylar önce
the biggest Irony about this is that for 100's of years (& maybe still) the UK did not look after any of its own art... yes Stonehenge, the Tower of London, Westminster Abbey but the 1000's of old churches, 1000's of Victorian buildings, 1000's of cottages, 1000's of local museums, schools and libraries... destroyed, neglected, abused
Evan Davies
Evan Davies Aylar önce
This episode made me feel guilty for growing up in a house with Ethiopian items all over on display. Then I remembered we have them because my Dad was in the fucking peace corps for 2 years, payed for them, loved their culture, their people, can read their language (still), survived a dangerous amoeba while teaching science living, humbly living a hut while having 3 Ethiopian children that he looked over for while he was there. There is absolutely a great moral way to have items from another culture, raiding priceless items with guns and stealing them couldn’t be any more “off”.
Chloe
Chloe 28 gün önce
I love museums and seeing all sorts of different cultures in one place, there is zero excuse to not give back antiquities that are requested back. Just fecking give them back and put up your british art like uhh idk a Margaret thatcher statue covered in egg yolk.
Gineen Cooper
Gineen Cooper 29 gün önce
and the Emmy goes to this episode ....for accurately portraying what museums REALLY are... LOOT PRISONS/colonizer trophy rooms. Kudos, dear John Oliver. and it's heartening to see that by today, Oct 20, 2022, over 5 million people have viewed this!
THOMAS PAPADOGIAS
THOMAS PAPADOGIAS Aylar önce
As a Greek person I am glad someone with a large audience like John Oliver is taking about this
Jordi Nagel
Jordi Nagel 29 gün önce
@Marc Whinery of course, after all, who doesn’t remember the crucial “You were negligent to let me steal your stuff, so it’s rightfully mine now” law?
Marc Whinery
Marc Whinery 29 gün önce
@Jordi Nagel You obviously can't care for your artefacts, you let the British steal them in the first place.
Edriss Scofield
Edriss Scofield 29 gün önce
Lmao you egghead I knew someone would reply to him seriously. It's not trolling either
Cole McMullin
Cole McMullin Aylar önce
I remember as a kid being really confused as to whhy a bunch of peices of the statues in the parthenon museum in athens were a different colour. when i asked the guide and learned that the peices were in other museums i felt really empty because i had come to the museum hoping to connect to the past and now i have to make a plan for after i graduate to go to see the other peices to make that visit feel complete. I guess that is just another reason to give back looted artifacts, it means i can go to one place to learn about the past and culture of the people who live(d) there instead of having to treck halfway around the world to get a complete picture.
Zwenk Wiel
Zwenk Wiel Aylar önce
@Jordi Nagel lol yeah, really only have yourself to blame here XD
May
May 15 saatler önce
my home country often comes up in passing during conversations about stolen art and artifacts, but i haven’t really seen a ton of in depth discussions beyond museums or those affected. our museums also contain a decent amount of nazi loot. works that were either seized from jewish families (or works they were forced to sell in order to flee) or works acquired from “degenerate art” exhibits. it’s just one of the many instances of my country’s complicity during ww2, and i do wish i saw more people talking about it !!
deathByStupid
deathByStupid Aylar önce
While there is pretty solid merit to the points John makes in the video, it seems pretty biased to completely omit all content on rampant looting that happened during the middle east conflict/arab spring, beyond looting there is the taliban literally just bombing and hammering national treasures into dirt. I think there is a solid argument that if a country achieves a certain level of stability, then you can argue the items can be returned. Is Nigeria the country that had 6 coups in 62 years since independence the optimal candidate for returning national treasures? The 2007 elections? Declared by international pundits to be rigged. The leaders in 2010-2015, famous for stealing 20 billion dollars and being unable to prevent terrorists from kidnapping 200 schoolgirls. What of all of this makes me think national treasures should go back to Nigeria? Pretty much none of it. I think they should eventually go back there, maybe in 50 or 100 years when there is a fully functioning government with equivalent control of its state as any average western society.
Pluto137
Pluto137 25 gün önce
that ending was amazing. Perfectly makes the point and funny. Also certainly did shake me thinking of history being more fucked but yeah maybe lets try put history back together. People not knowing for better or worse what the history is
Vanilla
Vanilla Aylar önce
Sometimes I forget that this happened in my country too, like we have modern day interpretations of what would’ve been available to see but most of it was taken. I really spent 35 minutes going “oh my god give everyone their shit back you monsters... oh wait... gimme my shit back too!”
Kit Hardwick
Kit Hardwick Aylar önce
I used to work for the natural science museum in Houston and they did go through their exhibits and their archives and return Native American artifacts to the various nations they belonged to. Then they worked with native artists and commissioned replicas for display. I don't know why other museums can't do something similar.
John Ericsson
John Ericsson 24 gün önce
@Zwenk Wiel hi
Zwenk Wiel
Zwenk Wiel Aylar önce
Who do you even give it to though? Like how do you give something to a nation? The chief or something just gets it? 🤔 Could imagine multiple people or organizations laying claim on the same item
Emerald Mara
Emerald Mara Aylar önce
@Tepid Ceranda You're a HYPOCRITE.
Mesha A
Mesha A Aylar önce
I'm glad for every piece returned that way and sad for every one that isn't... suffice to say I am a lot more sad than happy
carrieannthelibrarian
I would like to see more grants for replicas, or grants for reparations that include making replicas, or to create or renovate spaces for these items to return to.
John Weiss [he\him] 🏳️‍🌈
"What's something you thought was British, but isn't?" "The contents of the British Museum."
Ana Cárdenas
Ana Cárdenas 7 gün önce
As a Peruvian, what that man said in 12:45 just made my blood boil. Just outrageous, the amount of ransacking we’ve suffered over the years, they would’ve taken all of the ruins if they could lift them.
Luísa Costa Gomes
Luísa Costa Gomes Aylar önce
Wonderful episode! I am so proud of people who still fight the good fights!
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